Virtual reality (VR)—a concept that has been talked about for decades is fast becoming a reality itself. But despite the excitement, many VR devices aren’t widely owned. A very little is known about the audience that will grow into the first wave of VR content consumers.

Nielsen Study

Nielsen surveyed more than 8,000 consumers aged 18–54, dividing those interested in VR into two categories: PaVRs (pronounced “pavers”), who make up roughly 24% of the US population between 18 and 54, say it’s “likely that they will use or even possibly purchase VR technology in the next year”, while ConVRts (“converts”), who represent around 20% of US 18–54 population, “aren’t the most likely to try VR on their own, [but] exposure to even just a little information about the technology and applications boosts their interest levels”.

The market research firm found that PaVRs outspend the average consumer on tickets to concerts and live events by 195%, as well as on fast food by 179% and alcoholic beverages by 170%.

“Advertisers will be pleased to find that PaVRs are triple-A consumers,” says Nielsen’s director of lab research. “They adopt new products and service, they advocate for the brands they love and they appreciate premium quality – and are willing to pay a premium price.”

Like many new technologies, it seems that VR has more fans than experts. In fact, about one-fifth of the audience surveyed said they considered themselves knowledgeable about VR, while nearly one-quarter felt very positively about the technology.

Virtual Reality – The Real Concert Experience

2016 has so far seen a host of new live music-related VR projects as the technology gains ground in the industry, including joint ventures between VFX studio Digital Domain and Warner Music Taiwan, Universal Music and iHeartMedia and Live Nation and NextVR.

VR headsets were also handed out at AEG Live’s Coachella festival in April, Eindhoven venue Effenaar earlier this month announced plans to transform itself into a high-tech VR hub during the early-week lull and Wacken Open Air was filmed in VR to create “rock’s first narrative VR experience”.

Outdoor concerts, the crowds of fans converging, all the sideshow fun of a summer stadium gig: there’s nothing like the experience of seeing a big-name star rock a stadium. But between tours and from one big gig to the next, there’s a lot of down time. What if you could keep the summer fun going?

Outdoor concerts, the crowds of fans converging, all the sideshow fun of a summer stadium gig: there’s nothing like the experience of seeing a big-name star rock a stadium. But between tours and from one big gig to the next, there’s a lot of down time. What if you could keep the summer fun going? Save

Save

Save

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This